Monday, August 20, 2018

What Happens if a Navy Aircraft Carrier Is Sunk?

Are carriers too big to fail?

What Happens if a Navy Aircraft Carrier Is Sunk?

Are carriers too big to fail? If so, U.S. policymakers need to break themselves from the assumption that carriers are the end product of the evolution of naval technology. The United States must maintain its leadership role in military innovation; not fall into the age-old trap of other great powers by absconding modernization and relying instead on time-tested dogma and tradition. In the future our carriers and Navy servicemen may pay the ultimate price due to our complacency and failure to innovate.

Various defense pundits, scholars, and journalists have spent a considerable amount of digital ink debating the various threats to America’s carrier fleet while avoiding a more central question.

In the cliché phrase of our time: Are carriers too big to fail?

Clausewitz tells us, “war is the continuation of politics by other means.” Is there any political situation of such gravity that losing a carrier would be deemed an acceptable risk? In other words, how expendable are carriers? The answer to this question has large implications for the tactical and strategic options available to U.S. policymakers.

Total security from all risk is impossible. The aircraft carrier is not invulnerable to attack. The new U.S. Ford-class aircraft carrier will be a floating home to over 4,000 sailors and comes in at the hefty price tag of around $12 billion dollars. In light of the development and proliferation of anti-access/area-denial (A2/AD) weaponry, does this enormous investment of human resources narrow U.S. tactical and strategic options?

What are the implications of the sinking of a U.S. carrier?

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1920: Professional football is born

Men like this do not play
professional football anymore.
If they did, I'd still be a fan.
On this day in 1920, seven men, including legendary all-around athlete and football star Jim Thorpe, meet to organize a professional football league at the Jordan and Hupmobile Auto Showroom in Canton, Ohio. The meeting led to the creation of the American Professional Football Conference (APFC), the forerunner to the hugely successful National Football League.

Professional football developed in the 1890s in Pennsylvania, as local athletic clubs engaged in increasingly intense competition. Former Yale football star William “Pudge” Heffelfinger became the first-ever professional football player when he was hired by the Allegheny Athletic Association to play in a game against their rival the Pittsburgh Athletic Club in November 1892. By 1896, the Allegheny Athletic Association was made up entirely of paid players, making it the sport’s first-ever professional team. As football became more and more popular, local semi-pro and pro teams were organized across the country.

Professional football first proved itself a viable spectator sport in the 1910s with the establishment of The Ohio League. Canton, the premiere team in the league, featured legendary decathlete and football star Jim Thorpe. From his play with the Carlisle School to his gold medal in the decathlon in Stockholm in 1912 and his time in the outfield with John McGraw’s New York Giants, Thorpe was an international star who brought legitimacy to professional football. The crowds that Thorpe and the Canton team drew created a market for professional football in Ohio and beyond. Still, the league was struggling due to escalating player salaries, a reliance on college players who then had to forfeit their college eligibility and a general lack of organization.

On August 20, 1920, the owners of four Ohio League teams–the Akron Pros, Canton Bulldogs, Cleveland Indians and Dayton Triangles–met to form a new professional league. Jim Thorpe was nominated as president of the new league, as it was hoped Thorpe’s fame would help the league to be taken seriously. On September 17, the league met again, changing its short-lived name to the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and officially electing Jim Thorpe as the league’s first president.

The APFA began play on September 26, with the Rock Island Independents of Illinois defeating a team from outside the league, the St. Paul Ideals, 48-0. A week later, Dayton beat Columbus 14-0 in the first game between two teams from the APFA, the forerunner of the modern NFL.

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Sunday, August 19, 2018

Cuomo calls out Trump, says he's 'un-American'

Gov. Andrew Cuomo ramped up his war of words with President Donald Trump during a political speech at a Brooklyn church on Sunday morning, calling him "King Trump" and the "great divider in chief."

Standing from the pulpit at First Baptist Church of Crown Heights, Cuomo said his feud with the president "is not just politics as usual."

"This debate we’re having with the president is really about the country we want to be. This is about our values, our beliefs, our character," Cuomo said. "It is a frightening portrait."

“Trump’s America is one of division and intolerance,” Cuomo continued.

Cuomo came under fire last week after doing a riff on Trump’s "Make America Great Again" slogan during a bill signing ceremony.

"We’re not going to make America great again. It was never that great," Cuomo said.

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NFL: Jesse Hernandez debuts as first male Saintsation

No. Nonono.  Fuck no.
After spending about $100 on lower-bowl tickets and driving 2½ hours from the Lafayette area, Tracey Hernandez was nervous as she took her seat near midfield of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on Friday night.

It wasn’t the preseason game the Saints were about to play against Arizona that worried her — the dance instructor hardly watches football. What mattered to her was how her son, Jesse, would fare in his debut as the first-ever male member of the Saintsations, New Orleans’ NFL dance team.

The crowd in the stadium was the biggest Jesse had performed in front of since his dancing career began 23 years ago, at the age of 2.

The teasing and taunts he braved when he became the first boy to perform on the dance team at North Vermilion High School in his hometown of Maurice still stung Tracey.

But she calmed herself by reciting Jesse’s achievements up to this point — the competitions he’s won, the instructor gigs, his stint coaching the dance team for a minor-league hockey franchise in Lafayette that she herself once danced for.

She remembered how countless people had come up to her after word broke that Jesse had made the Saintsations and told her, “We are proud of him; we support him; give him our congratulations” — even burly men visiting the Harley-Davidson motorcycle shop where she works.

While she admitted being annoyed at online commenters who in recent weeks had insulted her son’s masculinity for becoming a Saintsation, she brushed them aside as kickoff time approached.

“Those people just need to get over it,” said Tracey Hernandez, who attended Friday’s game with three family friends, one of whom had an oversized, cutout picture of her son’s face.

“We’re in 2018. Things shouldn’t be just for men or just for women. If you have the ability to do it, you should be able to do it.”

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_________________________

No. - Minuteman

Snowflake Couple Bikes into ISIS Territory to Prove ‘Evil Is a Make-Believe Concept’ — Gets Killed by Jihadis

Those words above were from Jay Austin, who gave two weeks’ notice at his Washington, D.C., office job last summer before departing on a whirlwind bike tour of Europe, northern Africa, and the Middle East with his girlfriend, Lauren Geoghegan.

Sadly, the couple’s idyllic journey ended in tragedy.

The couple, both in their late 20s, ran into ISIS terrorists.

On day 369 of their world travels, the couple were biking through southern Tajikistan.

They were accompanied by two other bikers trekking through the exotic Central Asia climes.

The couple had set forth with the foolhardy bravado of urban youth. Austin was bold enough at one point in his journey to proclaim “evil” a false concept.

“You read the papers and you’re led to believe that the world is a big, scary place,” he wrote. “People, the narrative goes, are not to be trusted. People are bad. People are evil.”

“I don’t buy it. Evil is a make-believe concept we’ve invented to deal with the complexities of fellow humans holding values and beliefs and perspectives different than our own,” he continued.

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_____________________________

Dumbasses. - Minuteman

Saturday, August 18, 2018

Rule Five: If you could only ride one or the other...











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Video: Stories MSM tried to bury this week

CNN Accused of Intimidating Paul Manafort Jury

CNN is being accused of attempting to intimidate the Paul Manafort jury after the far-left cable channel (and six other anti-Trump outlets) requested the jurors’ names and home addresses.
Manafort, who worked for a short time as President Trump’s campaign chairman during the 2016 presidential election, has been charged by special counsel Robert Mueller with various financial crimes, none of which have anything to do with Trump or the campaign.

Manafort’s fate now sits with the jury, and after two days of deliberations, anti-Trump media outlets like CNN are becoming concerned Manafort could be acquitted, which would be a major blow to Mueller’s credibility and his ability to remove Trump from office — an outcome the establishment media are desperate to orchestrate.

And so, on Thursday, CNN, along with six other far-left media outlets (the Washington Post, BuzzFeed, Politico, the New York Times, NBC, and the AP) sued for the release of the names and home addresses of all of the Manafort jurors, a move that is both disturbing and almost unprecedented.

As Bre Payton at the Federalist points out, “Publicly outing the names and home addresses of jurors is considered ethically questionable, as outlined in this guidance sheet on the topic from the Reporter’s Committee for Freedom of the Press.”

To begin with, it is seen as unseemly to thrust jurors into the spotlight against their will when they are not volunteering for publicity; they are chosen.

What many see here, and not without precedent, is yet another attempt by the media, most especially CNN, to bully and intimidate private, everyday citizens into convicting Manafort.

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California governor grants pardons to 3 facing deportation

By DON THOMPSON

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Jerry Brown announced Friday he pardoned three former prisoners facing the threat of deportation to Cambodia, including one who became a youth pastor after serving six years in the 1990s for murdering a rival gang member.

The three were among 36 pardons granted by Brown within the past week. He’s also commuted the sentences of 31 current inmates who can now seek speedier paroles.

Among the pardons are Cambodian refugee Vanna In, who entered the United States at age 3. He served six years for the murder of a fellow gang member at age 17 but was released in 2001.

He subsequently started Jobs of Hope for former gang members, which Brown’s pardon says has “helped dozens of individuals to turn away from gangs and become law abiding, productive citizens.” He also became a youth minister at a Mennonite Brethren church and hundreds wrote to the governor attesting to his rehabilitation.

“While the seriousness of the crime can never be minimized,” Brown wrote, “I believe that Mr. In should be permitted to have the chance at remaining in a community to which he has devoted a life of service.”

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